Posts and podcasts

The Lost Island – 1879

Ireland as depicted on the 1572 map of Europe by Abraham Ortelius. Interesting are the prominent featuring of St. Patrick's Purgatory and the curious island of Brasil. Wikimedia Commons

Ireland as depicted on the 1572 map of Europe by Abraham Ortelius. Interesting are the prominent featuring of St. Patrick’s Purgatory and the curious island of Brasil.
Wikimedia Commons

New Zealand Tablet, Volume VII, Issue 327, 25 July 1879, Page 17

At a recent meeting of the Royal Dublin Society Dr. W. Frazer exhibited a copy of Tassin’s maps of the fortified towns of France, which was additionally interesting by its containing several original plans drawn by Tassin and bird’s-eye views of Casal and Evreux. It also contained a manuscript map of the opposite coasts of France and Britain, apparantly of the most scrupulous accuracy, and a Chart ot the Islands and Maritime Coasts of Europe, in which is to be seen the route and navigation of the Hollanders by the north of Ireland and Scotland during the wars with the English for the German Ocean.
The course is laid down from Holland along the Norwegian coasts then passes between Fair Island and Foula. It then continues along the western coast of Ireland passing Brazil, which is laid down much in the position now ascertamed to be occupied by the Porcupine Bank and hence the course continues direct to Rochelle.
This map is evidently no fanciful sketch. Every sailing point and headland has been skilfully laid down, either by one who has passed over the track itself, or by one who compiled it from most competent authority, and this at a time when no British ships appear to have sailed over these western seas, though we know that the Dutch and French sailors almost daily did.
The probable date of the unpublished and apparently unique work is 1640. This copy appears to be in the very handwriting of Tassin himself, who was geographer to the King, and it would, indeed, appear most probable that Brazil did, as an island, at this or about this time, hold its head over the waters of the North Atlantic Ocean, though over its site, and after a lapse of more than two centuries, those very waters, to the depth of from 80 to 100 fathoms, now roll.

The evidence, then, would be in favour of Brazil having existed as an island off the entrance to Galway Bay in A.D. 1640, or thereabout, and of its having gradually subsided into the bosom of the ocean.

Advertisements

About The Burren and Beyond

Archaeologist

Discussion

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Calendar

May 2014
M T W T F S S
« Apr   Jun »
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  

Categories

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 244 other followers

Archives

Blog Stats

  • 25,616 hits

Posts

May 2014
M T W T F S S
« Apr   Jun »
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  
%d bloggers like this: