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Ould Kinvarra – 1923

The Cork Examiner March 12, 1923
London Correspondence
(Through our private wire).
180, Fleet Street, Sunday Night.

Mr. Frank Fahy’s paper on “Ould Kinvarra” at the Irish Literary Society last night was one of the most delightful things the Society has had for many a long day. It was an authentic picture of Irish life in a little country town in the sixties and seventies. It was real because the memories were Mr. Fahy’s own memories, and yet as he truly said, other things being equal, it might have stood for a picture of life in any other little Irish town in the same period. Those of us who heard the paper saw the people of Kinvarra and heard their familiar talk in their homes and out of them, took part in their joys and sorrows, and were one with them in their passionate love of the scenes among which they moved, a love which years of exile from them and leagues of sea and land now lying between the exiles and them only seem to increase. The success of Mr. Fahy’s paper lay not only in the sympathetic chords it touched in the hearts of his audience but in the artistry with which he drew his picture, and the inimitable way in which he made every word tell. Every inflection in his voice was full of meaning. No one else could have written the paper, no one else could have read it so well. It was little wonder that in the subsequent discussion there were appeals to Mr. Fahy to have “Ould Kinvarra” printed – and along with it the other lecture which he gave not long ago before the Society in which he described the work of the Southwark Irish Literary Society in London in the eighties. The only drawback to the evening was that its attractiveness demonstrated severely how inadequate is the space in the Society’s room for such an occasion.

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Kinvara races – 1923

Connacht Tribune 7th July, 1923 p.7

Photo: EO'D
Photo: EO’D

Accident at Kinvara races
Two rather serious accidents occurred at Kinvara race meeting on Jun 28th. In the second race J. Norris, who was riding Mr. P. Donnelly’s Paravid, had the misfortune to fall and break his leg. In the fourth race, the Stewards’ Plate, M. Holland, who was riding Mr T. Wall’s Solid Gold, had a very nasty fall on his head. He was taken to St. Bride’s Home, Galway suffering from concussion of the brain. He is receiving treatment there and is progressing favourably.

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Galway Gaol – 1923

The Maitland Daily Mercury  (abridged)

rock
Photo: EO’D

15th January, 1923 p.5
Prisoners in Galway Gaol attempted to escape by excavating a tunnel under a wall with two old bayonets and a broken spade. They reached a point outside the wall but a great rock stopped their progress. While they were burrowing up a sentry heard and discovered them.

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Amhrán na bhFiann

The Catholic Press 31st July, 1919 p.21 (abridged)

burrengate
Burren Gate Photo: EO’D

A SOLDIER’S SONG
Barricade song of the Irish Volunteers, 1916
Composed in 1907, with words by Peadar Kearney and music by Kearney and Patrick Heeney. Translated into Irish by Liam Ó Rinn in 1923

We’ll sing a song, a soldier’s song,
With cheering, rousing chorus
As round our blazing fires we throng,
The starry heavens o’er us;
Impatient for the coming fight
And as we wait the morning’s light,
Here in the silence of the night,
We’ll chant the soldier’s song.

chorus
Soldiers are we, whose lives are pledged to Ireland,
Some have come, from the land beyond the wave,
Sworn to be free; no more our ancient sireland
Shall shelter the despot or the slave,
To night we man the Bearna Baoghail
In Erin’s cause come woe or weal,
‘Mid cannon’s roar, and rifle’s peal,
We’ll chant the soldier’s song.

Boats
Burren Gate Photo: EO’D

In valley green, on towering crag,
Our fathers fought before us,
And conquered ‘neath the same old flag
That’s proudly floating o’er us;
We’re children of a fighting race,
That never yet has known disgrace,
And as we march the foe to face,
We’ll chant the soldier’s song.

Sons of the Gael, men of the Pale,
The long-watched day is breaking,
The serried ranks of Innisfail
Shall set the tyrant quaking.
Our camp-fires now are burning low
See in the East the silvery glow,
Out yonder waits the Saxon foe,
Then chant the Soldier’s song.

————————————-

Seo dhíbh, a chairde, duan ÓgláighBurren
Caithréimeach bríomhar ceolmhar
Ár dtinte cnámh go buacach táid
‘S an spéir go mín réaltógach
Is fonnmhar faobhrach sinn chun gleo
‘S go tiúnmhar glé roimh thíocht don ló
Fé chiúnas chaomh na hoíche ar seol
Seo libh, canaídh Amhrán na bhFiann

Sinne Fianna Fáil
atá faoi gheall ag Éirinn,
Buíon dár slua
thar toinn do ráinig chugainn,
Faoi mhóid bheith saor
Seantír ár sinsear feasta,
Ní fhágfar faoin tíorán ná faoin tráill.
Anocht a théam sa bhearna baoil,
Le gean ar Ghaeil, chun báis nó saoil,
Le gunna scréach faoi lámhach na bpiléar,
Seo libh canaídh amhrán na bhfiann

Cois bánta réidhe, ar ardaibh sléibheWreck
Ba bhuadhach ár sinsir romhainn
Ag lámhach go tréan fén sárbhrat séin
‘Tá thuas sa ghaoth go seolta
Ba dhúchas riamh dár gcine cháidh
Gan iompáil siar ó imirt áir
‘S ag siúl mar iad i gcoinne námhad
Seo libh, canaídh Amhrán na bhFiann

Sinne Fianna Fail…

A bhuíon nach fann d’fhuil Ghaeil is Gall
Sin breacadh lae na saoirse
Tá sceimhle ‘s scanradh i gcroíthe námhad
Roimh ranna laochra ár dtíre
Ár dtinte is tréith gan spréach anois
Sin luisne ghlé sa spéir anoir
‘S an bíobha i raon na bpiléar agaibh
Seo libh, canaídh Amhrán na bhFiann

Sinne Fianna Fail…

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Galway to Kinvara – 1923

Connacht Tribune 29th December, 1923 p.5 (abridged)

Across the Bay Photo: EO'D
Across the Bay
Photo: EO’D

The Council of the Galway Chamber of Commerce had an interesting discussion at its meeting on Friday evening last on the question of linking up the towns around Galway Bay more closely with the city, and developing traffic on the Corrib. Prof. A. Eraut, M.A. occupied the chair; and the discussion was mitigated by Mr J.O’Kelly-Lynch, who said that Mr Winkle, Mr Feeney and other merchants in Kinvara had pointed out to him that much of the trade of that town was done with Ennis and Limerick, and that it could be diverted to Galway provided regular communication were established across the Bay. The pier at Kinvara was available even for a boat like the Dun Aengus. The gentlemen mentioned had sent him a telegram that day saying that they would offer their utmost support to any proposal to establish closer communication by sea.
Mr. M.J.Crowley, H.C., thought it would be well to discuss the whole matter with Captain Meskill of the Dun Aengus, who was an expert on these matters. The Galway Bay Co.’s boat had only nine feet of a draft, but he believed that at times she had to be in the mud at Kinvara.
Mr. Sp. P. Corbett said that Commander Hanan had a small boat at the docks, and he had made an effort to establish a commercial trade with Kinvara, but it had not been a success.
Mr C.C. Copeland, of the City of Galway Shipping Co., said he thought that Commander Hanan had some trouble with his engines at Kinvara, and the wages he was compelled to pay for repairs over there took away anything he could earn on the venture.
It was resolved that the secretary should communicate with the traders of Kinvara as to what traffic they could guarantee and consult Captain Meskill and the owner of the boat on the Corrib.

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Kinvara races – 1923

Connacht Tribune 7th July, 1923 p.11

Photo: BO'D
Photo: BO’D

Sweltering sun, choking dust, and a dome of bunting surmounting a riot of animated colour were the order at Gortshanvogh. The meeting differed from the usual “flapper.” Of course, all the “trickies” and “habituals” were there, but the neighbours, who feel they have a proprietary interest in “the races” and who assume the responsibility with a genial “You are welcome to Kinvara” air predominated. There was some indefinable something – something inherent, though unobtruding – which marked Kinvara meeting, apart from the usual type, and the day a pleasant outing (sic.). The course was hard, and many riders parted company with their mounts to meet its unwelcome embrace.
Details;
The VOLUNTEER PLATE £12; Hurdle – 2 miles
Mr P. Torpey’s Master McGuire
Mr J. O’Neill’s Distant Shore
Mr T. Quinn’s Waverley
Also ran – Silver Ring.

The TRADERS’ PLATE £10 Hurdle – 2 miles
Mr T. Quinn’s Waverley
Mr P. Donnelly’s Paravid
Also ran – Home Dock (fell)

KINVARA PLATE £20 Steeplechase – 2 1/2 miles
Mr P. Murphy’s Clare Girl
Mr J. O’Neill’s Distant Shore
Also Ran – Paravid

STEWARDS’ PLATE £8 Flat 1 1/2 miles
Mr J. O’Neill’s Distant Shore
Also ran – Solid Gold (fell) and Paravid

GORTSHANVOGH PLATE £8 Flat 1 1/2 miles
Mr T. McKenna’s Home Dock
Mr J. O’Neill’s Distant Shore
Mr T. Quinn’s Waverley
Also ran – Solid Gold (fell) and Golden Cherry

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UNION, DISTRICT  COUNTY COUNCIL NOTICES
________________________________________
COUNTY GALWAY COMMITTEE OF AGRICULTURE.
____________
Scheme of Prizes for Cottages and Small Farms, 1906

RETURN OF PRIZEWINNERS.
______________
GORT RURAL DISTRICT.

Class I;

Photo: EO'D
Photo: EO’D

1st, Michael Lally, Lisheeninane, Kinvarra £3
2nd Thos. McDonnell, Kilcolgan, Oranmore, £2
3rd, Thos. Dunne, Dungora, Kinvara £1 10s

Class II;
1st, Jane Finucane, Duras, Kinvarra £3 15s
2nd, John Keeley, Ballyclerra, Kinvara  £3
3rd John Shaughnessy, Royanrush Gort £2
4th Jas. Prendergast, Ballinabucky, Peterswell £1 10s
5th Patk Meally, junr, Knockakilleen, Kinvara £1

———————————————-

Freemans Journal 13th August, 1923 p. 27

LEINSTER SCHOOL OF MUSIC, DUBLIN
Results of Examinations in Piano, Violin, Violoncello, Singing, Harmony, Theory of Music and Choir.

Convent of Mercy Kinvara

Piano – 1st Hons;
Sistie O’Dea
Mollie Greene
Mairaid Flatley
Esther Corless
Mary Ellen Phelan

2nd Hons
May Quinn

Pass

Blanche Connolly
Jennie O’Dea

Prep 1st Hons;
Clare Johnston
Annette Murphy
Joe Corless
Cissie Corless

2nd Hons;
Pauline Murphy
Kathleen Quinn
Joe Paul Flatley
Fred Johnston

Pass;
Maureen Haran
Alphonsus O’Dea
Sally Winkle

Violin – J – 1st Hons;
Margaret Mary Flatley

Primary, 2nd Hons;
Richard Johnston

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A Gross Exaggeration – 1923

Freemans Journal 16th August, 1923 p 5

Kinvara Photo: Cresswell Archives
Kinvara
Photo: Cresswell Archives

Galway Wednesday
Amazement was expressed in Kinvara at the report published in yesterday’s “Irish Independent,” that revolver shots had been fired at the meeting on Sunday last, and that eight people had been wounded.
The facts were given to me today by the Very Rev. M. Cannon Fahy, P.P., Kinvara, who presided at the meeting, and opened the proceedings by speaking in favour of the Treaty. He asked that those who had come to address them should get a fair hearing.
When Mr Geo. Nicholls, one of the Cumann na nGaedheal candidates, rose to address the meeting, he was cordially received by the greater mass of the poeple, but a group of about fifteen youths immediately began to interrupt and heckle the speaker.
Four young men who had arrived in Kinvara earlier in a motor car immediately approached the interrupters, and told them that they would not be allowed to upset the meeting.
Canon Fahy asked for a fair hearing for the speakers, and order was temporarily restored. Later however, the interruptions were renewed, and something in the nature of a free fight took place between the four men who had objected to the interrupters and the youths, who were putting a number of questions to Mr. Nicholls.
Ultimately the interrupters surrounded the four men, whereupon they produced revolvers. At this the crowd fled in panic and the meeting came to a conclusion. Canon Fahy assured me that not a single shot was fired, and the report of the affair was a gross and scandalous exaggeration.

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Francis A. Fahy – 1923

Irish Examiner 12th March, 1923 p4.

Home of Francis A. Fahy, poet and songwriter; 1854-1935 Kinvara Wikimedia Commons
Home of Francis A. Fahy, poet and songwriter; 1854-1935
Kinvara
Wikimedia Commons

Mr Frank Fahy’s paper on “ould Kinvarra” at the Irish literary Society last night was one of the most delightful things the Society has had for many a long day. It was an authentic picture of Irish life in a little country town in the sixties and seventies. It was real because the memories were Mr. Fahy’s own memories, and yet as he truly said, other things being equal, it might have stood for a picture of life in any other little Irish town in the same period.

Those of us who heard the paper saw the people of Kinvarra and heard their familiar talk in their homes and out of them, took part in their joys and sorrows, and were one with them in their passionate love of the scenes among which they moved, a love which years of exile from them and leagues of sea and land now lying between the exiles and them only seem to increase.

The success of Mr. Fahy’s paper lay not only in the sympathetic chords it touched in the hearts of his audience but in the artistry with which he drew his picture, and the inimitable way in which he made every word tell. Every inflection in his voice was full of meaning. No one else could have written the paper. No one else could have read it so well. It was little wonder that in the subsequent discussion there were appeals to Mr. Fahy to have “Ould Kinvarra” printed – and along with it the other lecture which he gave not so long ago before the Society in which he described the work of the Southwark Irish Literary Society in London in the eighties. The only drawback to the evening was that its attractiveness demonstrated severely how inadequate is the space in the Society’s room for such an occasion

William Boyle.