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THE LOUGHNANE BROTHERS


The Schools’ Collection, Volume 0050, Page 0147
Image and data © National Folklore Collection, UCD.
Collector: Eileen Kelly, Keanspound, Gort

Garryland Photo: EO’D

This was composed by a local poet who’s name is unknown.
It is about the Loughnane brothers, natives of Shanaglish beyond Gort. They were members of the I.R.A. and they were brutally burned by the English. They were dragged behind two carriers for three miles and they died near Kinvara. Their bodies were then thrown into a pond and were not discovered till ten days afterwards. The Tans that committed this outrage in Nov. 1920 (abridged)


As the winter’s wind blew wild on a cold November’s night,
The sad news reached Kinvara of a mournful tragic sight,

It was the finding of two brothers pale corpses lay side by side,
Far from their loving mother these true hearted brothers died,
They were taken by our enemies while threshing their mother’s corn,
And came back cold corpses to the place where they were born,
They were taken in a lorry by a military escort,
From their native home Shanaglish
Three miles south-west of Gort.
II
They were dragged behind two carries for three miles and more,
Till the blood gushed from their faces and their bodes bruised and sore,
They were taken to Drimharsin on a clear November’s day,
While the blood gushed from their faces
and their roars were head for miles away.
“What they suffered God only knows.”
III
Their bodies were brutally burned as they lay upon the ground,
Then left into a pond to prevent them from being found,
For ten long days in this desolate grave unblessed by any priest
Those martyred brothers Loughnanes by God’s aid was released,
To an old house near Kinvara the funeral marched next day,
Under a body guard of I.R.A. who took the remains away.
IV
That day was a sorrowful day for their mother,
To see the fresh blood oozing from a wound in Harry’s side,
Poor Padraigh’s flesh was torn, o’er his eyes were boiled within,
There was nothing left to recognize but a nose and half a chin,
His brothers bones lay visible as cold corpses they did lie,
Their bodies they were coffined and wrapped in brown and white,
And left into the Church of God where they rested that night.
V
The following day was a mournful sight for the mother of the brave,
To see her darling boys going to the bosom of the clay,
Those brother nursed with tender care are now beneath the sod,
Their spirits are despite their foes today before their God,
In the church yard of Shanaglish those two young heroes lie,
They gave their blood for Ireland and died for you I, (sic)
And gave up all they had on earth and suffered all these pains,
To strike for you anther blow and smash the Saxon chains.
VI
Is there any rebel here amongst you still to repeat those words again,
To thread the path of dauntless men who have suffered without fear or disdain,
But if you be true to England by obeying her Saxon laws,
They you’ll soon forget our men shot down by the cold blooded murderers, the servants of the Crown,
Let this ring throughout land and echo over the main,
That our gallant Loughnane brothers were not sacrificed in vain.

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Snippets – 1920/21

Petrie Photo: EO’D

Freemans Journal 19th July, 1920 p5
Kinvara police barrack, which was evacuated last week, was demolished shortly afterwards. The courthouse was also demolished and the records burned. The empty barrack at Moy has been burned.

Connacht Tribune 18th September, P8
Compensation claims;
20,000 for the burning of Tyrone House, Kilcolgan
5,000 for the wounding of Head constable Elliott at Ardrahan
2,000 for damage to Kinvara barracks etc

Connacht Tribune February files 1921 – awards printed in the Connacht Sentinal 24th February, 1953, page 2
Mrs Fanny Sharp, 76 Prince of Wales Mansions, Battersea Park, London and Edward J. Moore, Dunstive, Co. Kildare, claimed 2,000 for the burning of Kinvara Court house in August of 1920; award 790.
Elizabeth Nally and Ellen Hynes Kinvara were awarded 925 for the burning of Kinvara police barracks in July, 1920. John Bermingham, Kinvara was awarded 60 for the destruction of a side car and harness. John Killeen Dungora, Kinvara, was awarded 275 for bodily injuries received in April.

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William Hynes, Kinvara – 1920

Connacht Tribune – 1920

The Art of Making Rebels
HOW THE GOVERNMENT PERSECUTED A KINVARA MAN AND HIS FRIENDS
Mr. William Hynes, Kinvara, one of the hunger strikers recently released from Wormwood Scrubbs, was arrested at Abbey, Loughrea, early in Spring, and confined in Galway prison. He was remanded on a few occasions while “the minions of the law” were trying to make a case against him, but subsequently he was released without a stain on his character. The Government, not to be outdone, re-arrested him a few weeks later, and deported him to Wormwood Scrubbs along with Mr. Patrick Kilkelly, now the chairman of the Gort District Council, and hundreds of others.
Mr. Hynes is the youngest son of Mr. Patrick Hynes, Doongora, Kinvara, and comes of a good old stock of fighting Nationalists. He is grandson of the late “honest Bartly Hynes,” of Killina, the first man in Ireland to be prosecuted for having his name in Irish printed on his cart, and who, to credit be it said, refused to pay the fine imposed by a pair of British “Removables.” His brother, Mr. Michael Hynes, was arrested after the Rebellion of 1916, and imprisoned at Frongoch. His cousin, the late Mr. Patrick Hamberry was, following the Rebellion, imprisoned in Frongoch, and died as a result of his cruel treatment immediately after his release.

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Kinvara Races – 1920

CONNACHT TRIBUNE 23TH SEPTEMBER 1920

Kinvara
Photo: Norma Scheibe

Officials—Dr. T. J. Connolly,
Judge. B. J. Winkle
Starter. M. J. Leech
Clerk of Scale and Course. P. Kilkelly,
President. P. C. Feeney,
Treasurer. J. B. Davenport, Hon.
Sec. M. Valentine

  1. B,. Dunbar, Secretary of the Irish Racing _Association , Handicapper.

Stewards—P. J. Flatley, F. J. Johnston, M. Staunton, J. Burke, M. Hynes, E. Connors, M. Greene, C. St, George, W. Hynes, T. St. George.

PROGRAMME:
First Race, 1.30 .p.m.—THE VOLUNTEER PLATE. A Hurdle Handicap of £15. Distance about 2 miles. The second horse to receive £2 out of Plate. Entrance Fee, 7s 6d.

Second Race 2.30 p,m.—TRADERS’ PLATE. A Hurdle Handicap ot £12. Distance about 2 miles. Tho second horse to receive £1 out of Plate. Entrance Fee, 7s. 6d.

Third ‘Race, 3.15 p.m.—KINVARA PLATE A Handicap Steeplechase of £25 Distance about 2 and a half miles. Second horse to receive £2 out of Plate. Entrance Fee, 10s.

Fourth Race, 4 p.m.—STEWARDS’ PLATE. A Flat Handicap Race of £10. Distance about 1 and a half miles. The second horse to receive £1 out of Plate. Entrance Fee., 7s. 6d.

Fifth Race; 4.45 p.m.—GORTSHANVOGH PLATE. A Flat Race of £8. Distance about l and a half miles. Second to receive £1 out of Plate. Catch Weights at 9st. 71bs. and over. Entry 5s. To close at scales with Mr. Leech.

GENERAL ENTRY £1. RULES:

The decision of the Stewards to be final in all cases. No appeal to a court of law-All Entries to be made with Sir. Valentine J. R. Dunbar, Handicapper, 28, North William Street, Dublin. Three horses the bona-fide property of different owners to start or no race. All Jockeys must wear colours. All accounts due by Race Committee to be furnished to the Hon. Sec. within one fortnight after Races.
Entries Close September 16th.

ADMISSION TO COURSE 1s.
Tariff — Tents, £1; Motors, 5s.; Vehicles, 2s. 6d. Steamboat and Char-a-banc services from Galway arranged for. (Char a banc is an early type of bus service used for pleasure trips. It was usually open topped.)

A Pipers Band will be in Attendance.

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Ballyvaughan – 1920

Irish Independent 22nd September, 1920 p5.

Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare Photo: Velela Wikimedia Commons
Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare
Photo: Velela
Wikimedia Commons

A report reached Ennis that the police barracks at Ballyvaughan was attacked.  Military went from Ennis to the assistance of the garrison.  All wires in the district were cut.  A Republican flag floating from the roof of the Town Hall was removed by military and another which was replaced there was also removed.

 

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Kinvara – 1920

Connacht Tribune 19th June, 1920

The Quay, Kinvara Photo: TO'D
The Quay, Kinvara
Photo: TO’D

Village invaded
On Sunday night Kinvara was invaded by a crowd from Kiltartan and Ardrahan returning from the Belharbour sports who kicked up a noise that the people were in fear and terror of their lives all night. The crowd made a sweep on a Connemara hooker that was lying at the quay and commanded the skipper, with a loud shout of “Hands up,” to hand over a jar of poteen which he had in the boat. On getting it they carried it off in triumph. After imbibing a bit too freely of the contents, a row arose over the division of the spoils and the jar was smashed to atoms.
The owner of the boat took a bicycle from the fellow who captured the poteen and in throwing the machine into the boat he missed the mark and it fell into the tide. The owner of the bike and his confreres cycled to Duras to intercept the boatman “homeward bound,” and after chartering a small boat they were informed that the bike had been thrown into the sea at Kinvara.
They returned to Kinvara and kept shouting and singing at intervals until seven or eight pm. One or two of the party took possession of a ladder and went on the roof of a thatched house, and with lighted candles threatened to set it on fire. Another batch of them threw cars and everything they could lay hands on into the tide and did a lot of damage, while broken bicycles were found on every road.

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Tyrone House – 1920

Tuam Herald 4th September, 1920 p.2 (abridged)TTTTTT
A correspondent sends us some interesting  details of the malicious burning of Tyrone House, the ancestral home of the St. Georges – a family settled in Ireland for over three hundred years, and for over one hundred, the most prominent and influential in the county of Galway. This splendid and imposing structure, which could be seen for miles around, was built by the late Christopher St. George, D.L., at a cost  of over fifty thousand pounds.  It could not be built now for two hundred thousand pounds. It was in the late Georgian style and the finest house in Ireland. The ceilings were all painted by Italian masters and were regular works of art. The mantle pieces were of rare Italian marble and very costly. In the hall was a fine full-sized marble statue of Baron St. George, again the work of an Italian artist. The head was broken off the night of the raid.  All the ceilings and mantle pieces are now ruined, and the entire structure an empty shell and ruin.

There was no grounds for the report that the military or police intended or were to occupy the house, and agrarian motives are believed to have inspired and instigated this act of purely wanton destruction.

Of late years the place was freely allowed to be used by pleasure parties who came out from Loughrea and other places to have a dance which cost them nothing, and who were never prevented from having their pleasure and a dance on the spacious floor of the dining room.  They can now no longer do so, where in olden days the finest balls in the county Galway took place.

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The art of making rebels – 1920

Connacht Tribune 3rd July 1920 p4

William Hynes Kinvara. Photo: Connacht Tribune 1920
Photo: Connacht Tribune 1920

(abridged) How the Government Persecuted a Kinvara man and his friends. Mr William Hynes, Kinvara, one of the hunger strikers recently released from Wormwood Scrubbs, was arrested at Abbey, Loughrea, early in spring and confined in Galway prison. He was remanded on a few occasions while “The minions of the law” were trying to make a case against him, but subsequently he was released without a stain on his character. The Government, not to be outdone, arrested him a few weeks later, and deported him to Wormwood Scrubbs along with Mr Patrick Kilkelly, now the chairman of the Gort District council, and hundreds of others. Mr Hynes is the youngest son of Mr Patrick Hynes, Doongora, Kinvara and comes of a good old stock of fighting Nationalists. He is grandson of the late “honest Bartly Hynes,” of Killina, the first man in Ireland to be prosecuted for having his name in Irish printed on his cart, and who, to credit be it said, refused to pay the fine imposed by a pair of British “Removables.” His brother Mr Michael Hynes, was arrested after the Rebellion of 1916, and imprisoned at Frongoch. His cousin, the late Mr Patk Hamberry was jailed, following the Rebellion, and died as a result of his cruel treatment immediately after his release.

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Humour from Aughinish – 1907/1920

Sunday Independent 29th December 1907 p2 (abridged)

Behind the wall Photo: EO'D
Behind the wall
Photo: EO’D

Four prizes of half a crown each ar awarded every week for the four best jokes received for this column. Below are two prize-winning entries.

Poet to Editor:    “What do you think of this little poem of mine – ‘She would not smile?’

Editor to Poet:   “I think if you had read the poem to her she might have done”

Winner :Miss Nora McInerney
Aughnish, New Quay, Burrin P.O. County Clare

——————————————
and from the Sunday independent 17th October 1920 p6

Girl to friend: “I found that astronomer rather dull. He used to talk to me about the stars.”

Friend: “I don’t find him dull,” averred the other girl ecstatically.

“He says he talks to the stars about me.”

Winner: Miss Margaret McInerney,
Aughinish, Kinvarra, Co. Galway.