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Church of Ireland, Kinvara – 1939

Tom May, Churches of Galway, Kilmacduagh and Kilfenora, Galway 2000

Church of England Graveyard, The Glebe,
Kinvara
Photo: EO’D

In 1939 Bishop Browne purchased a Church of Ireland building in Kinvara for 25 pounds and transferred
it to Noughaval, roofing the new structure with timbers from Galway gaol!

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Galway Gaol – 1883

New York Tribune 14th January 1883 p.1

Photo: EO'D
Photo: EO’D

The ghost of Miles Joyce is the latest witness against Saxon tyranny.  As the warders of Galway Jail have made application for a transfer to another prison, it is probable that the ghost carries a musket and uses threats. Lord Spencer has personally undertaken the maintenance of the two boys, who are the only remaining members of the Joyce family massacred in County Galway.

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Galway Gaol – 1923

The Maitland Daily Mercury  (abridged)

rock
Photo: EO’D

15th January, 1923 p.5
Prisoners in Galway Gaol attempted to escape by excavating a tunnel under a wall with two old bayonets and a broken spade. They reached a point outside the wall but a great rock stopped their progress. While they were burrowing up a sentry heard and discovered them.

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Galway Gaol – 1846

Welshman 25th February 1846

HMS Warrior - Prison Ship Mayhew, Henry and Binny John. The Criminal Prisons of London, and Scenes of Prison Life, Volume 3 of The Great Metropolis, Griffin, Bohn, and Company, 1862,  Wikimedia Commons
HMS Warrior – Prison Ship
Mayhew, Henry and Binny John. The Criminal Prisons of London, and Scenes of Prison Life, Volume 3 of The Great Metropolis, Griffin, Bohn, and Company, 1862,
Wikimedia Commons

At Galway county special sessions the board of superintendence applied for £7,350 for maintenance of the county gaol, bridewells, courthouses etc. The Rev Mr D’Arcy said that from the vast number of prisoners lately committed, the prison was more like a poorhouse than a gaol, there being nearly a thousand prisoners in it.

The state of the gaol was frightful and, in order to relieve it, an application had been made for a hulk to put some of the prisoners in, otherwise the spread of contagion would be awful. After some discussion the presentment was passed.

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Up Ballinderreen! – 1888

New Zealand Tablet 10th February, 1888 p9tyrone house

Over 200 men from the parish of Ballinderreen assembled at Kilcolgan to build a house for Redmond Grealy, an evicted tenant, Grealy was evicted in 1883 by William St. George, Tyrone House, his landlord. Since his eviction Grealy has made a long and stubborn fight to keep a grip of his homestead. For retaking possession he has been summoned frequently, heavily fined, sent twice to gaol and his wife three times to gaol.

On their return home from Galway Gaol, Grealy and his wife were met by over 200 men, who escorted them and installed them in the house they had built.

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Welcoming the “criminals” – 1889

Galway Gaol c.1930
Galway Gaol c.1930
Zealand Tablet Vol XVII I. 18 23rd August, 1889 p 21

Jas. Keane, Thomas Prendergast, Pat Moylon, Robert Thomson and Michael Burke of Ardrahan, were recently released from the gentle care of Balfour’s turnkeys in Galway Gaol, after being two months there. They were met by the Craughwell band, with Father Considine. Contingents from Gort, Kinvara, Kilbecanty and Clarenbridge were on hand to welcome the “criminals”.