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The insufferable James Joyce – 1924

Advocate Melbourne 2nd October, 1924 p.20 (abridged)

James Joyce Photo: Alex Ehrenzweig 1915 Wikimedia Commons
James Joyce
Photo: Alex Ehrenzweig 1915
Wikimedia Commons

In a letter from our London correspondent, which appears in this issue, reference is made to a couple of plays which pretend to treat certain phases of Irish character. These plays bring into being a new “stage Irishman.” This mythical “gentleman” is far worse than the old “stage Irishman,” with his impossible simian countenance, his red nose, his “begobs” and “begorras” and his made-to-order jokes. The latter, being however absurd and ridiculous a mis-creation, was at any rate “clean” in his patter and in his characterisation. Not so the new “stage Irishman,” who is a repulsive and brutal type, a ruffian and a disgrace. And the worst of it is that he was created first by Irishmen.

Synge, for all his wonderful manner of making a new Kiltartan out of phrases made many of his characters outrageous. His own pessimism and irreligious characteristics are too often found in those characters.
Brinsley MacNamara and the insufferable James Joyce have, each in his own way, made Irish character repulsive and disgusting. We can hardly blame those responsible for the occasional appearance of the old stage Irishman – as the “Herald” in the case of a recent cartoon – when Irishmen themselves are found creating and exploiting that baseless monstrosity, the new and the worse, stage Irishman.

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Francis A. Fahy – Kinvara – 1924

Connacht Tribune 8th March, 1924 p.14

Main Street, Kinvara Photo: Cresswell archives
Main Street, Kinvara
Photo: Cresswell archives

Francis A. Fahy on Kinvara; (abridged)
I left Kinvara in ’73 (1873), a youth of 19.  Its scenes, its people, their customs, sports, recreations, their kindliness and affection, their good humour and lightheartedness, their abiding faith in God, are as fresh in my memory after 50 years of exile as things of yesterday, and have ever been the inspiration of my songs. I thank God that I have lived to see the first hues of a new dawn brighten over my native hills.

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Galway to Kinvara 1924

Freemans Journal 19th January, 1924 p8

Galway Bay Photo: Norma Scheibe
Galway Bay
Photo: Norma Scheibe

Lieut Commander O’Donnell, of the Free State Coastal Patrol, a native of the Aran Islands, has initiated a scheme of coastal traffic in Galway Bay and proposes to run a direct service from Galway to Kinvara with the motor boat, St. Nicholas, and later to trade along the Northern coast of the county to Clifden.
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Kinvarra Cailíns – 1924

Burren Gentian Photo: Friedrich Böhringer  Wikimedia Commons -
Burren Gentian
Photo: Friedrich Böhringer Wikimedia Commons –

“Black as the storm frown of Cruachan;

glossy as the shimmer of sun-glad Corrib;

trusty as the unclenching granite of Achil’s wave-vexed shore;

beauteous as the dream cailins of Kinvarra!

… In Connacht, some day they will be telling the tale of Grainne’s wondrous courage and tireless arrowy speed.

In Connacht they will twine garlands of bog-flower and shamrogue to deck your silky mane.

“Failte!” they will shout, to greet our return.”

The Catholic Press 30th October, 1924 p 49
Excerpt from Chpt XVII
The Sword of the O’Malleys by Justin Mitchell

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Galway – 1924

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

Geraldton Guardian 15th April, 1924
The Bishop of Galway in a speech advised the parents of wayward girls to ‘lay the lash across their backs.’ Referring to the shameful lack of chastity among youngsters he said; ‘I blame the girls themselves. They are not innocent and are not misled. Some of our Irish girls are becoming regular devils and a disgrace to the countywide. If it were not for the boys’ purity, there would be more scandals than now.’