Posted in Posts and podcasts

A respectable young man – 1886

Fort Worth Daily Gazette, 2nd February, 1886, p.4

Blue Gentian Photo: EO'D
Blue Gentian
Photo: EO’D

The other day there left Dublin for Galway by the Midland railroad, a respectable young man who could not speak or understand one word of English. He has never spoken any other language than Irish.
He had been a fortnight in Dublin and during that time required, in the capital of his native country, to be accompanied everywhere by an interpreter.

Posted in Posts and podcasts

As Gaeilge – 1886

Fort Worth Daily Gazette 2nd February, 1886 p4 (abridged)

Irish speakers in 2011 SkateTier  Wikimedia Commons -
Irish speakers in 2011 SkateTier
Wikimedia Commons –

The other day there left from Galway by the Midland railroad an able young man who could not understand one word of English. He had never spoken any other language but Irish. He had been a fortnight in Dublin and during that time required, in the capital of his native country, to be accompanied everywhere by a interpreter.
The young man is a native of the Island of Buffin, off the Connemara coast where out of 600 or 700 inhabitants only nine speak English.

 

Posted in Posts and podcasts

Dublin via Loughrea – 1886

St. Paul daily Globe, 18 December 1886 p4

Kerry Bog Pony Photo: Jim Linwood  Wikimedia Commons
Kerry Bog Pony
Photo: Jim Linwood
Wikimedia Commons

Dublin Dec 17
Mr Dillon and Mr O’Brien arrived here today. Both are much disturbed and hurt physically. In addition to the troubles which the gentlemen had yesterday at Loughrea when they were arrested for acting as tenants’ trustees, they met with an accident on the road home. The horse drawing the car on which they were riding from Loughrea to Athenry bolted on the way and both were thrown violently to the ground. The gentlemen were badly shaken up and considerably bruised by their fall.

During the progress of the meeting at Loughrea yesterday, at which Messers Dillon, O’Brien, Harris and Sheehy were arrested, Mr Sheehy received a summons to appear and show cause to keep the peace because of a speech he made recently at Kylebeg and which, it was claimed, was calculated to arouse disorder.

Posted in Posts and podcasts

Kinvarra Petty Sessions – 1886

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
NEW ZEALAND TABLET VOLUME XIV ISSUE 34 17TH DECEMBER, 1886 P 19

At the Kinvarra Petty Sessions on September 22 before Colonel Mallon, R.M. and major Blake, 37 men were charged with unlawful assembling and breaking the fences on the lands of Cahergilssane, the property of Arthur Persse. The first Crown witness, a man named Clayton, refused to give evidence, and was committed for eight days. Three other witnesses were examined, who gave evidence as to the assembly of a crowd, but could only identify one of the defendants as forming a part of it.
On cross-examination by Mr McDonagh, it was elicited that there was a hurling match on a neighbouring field, not the property of Mr Persse, and that the cattle were frightened by the noise and runaway, breaking through the fence. Mr McDonagh asked for a dismiss on the merits, to which the bench agreed, and also to the liberation of Clayton, who refused to give evidence, seeing the failure of the Crown cae.