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Galway – 1846

Indiana State Sentinel 19th march, 1846

Galway Cathedral Photo: EO'D
Galway Cathedral
Photo: EO’D

The government has again learned the necessity to increase the military force in Galway. A troop of the 13th Light Dragoons from Gort, arrived here on Tuesday, under the command of Captain Hamilton, for the purpose of repressing any outbreak among the people which may arise owing to the exportation of corn from this port.

Two companies of the 30th are likewise expected – one from Loughrea, the other from Oughterard – to aid the force in garrison, if necessary. This increase of troops is said to have been caused by the posting of a threatening notice at the Gashouse last week, to the effect that the merchant stores would be broken up by the people, if any further exportation of corn was attempted.

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Galway Gaol – 1846

Welshman 25th February 1846

HMS Warrior - Prison Ship Mayhew, Henry and Binny John. The Criminal Prisons of London, and Scenes of Prison Life, Volume 3 of The Great Metropolis, Griffin, Bohn, and Company, 1862,  Wikimedia Commons
HMS Warrior – Prison Ship
Mayhew, Henry and Binny John. The Criminal Prisons of London, and Scenes of Prison Life, Volume 3 of The Great Metropolis, Griffin, Bohn, and Company, 1862,
Wikimedia Commons

At Galway county special sessions the board of superintendence applied for £7,350 for maintenance of the county gaol, bridewells, courthouses etc. The Rev Mr D’Arcy said that from the vast number of prisoners lately committed, the prison was more like a poorhouse than a gaol, there being nearly a thousand prisoners in it.

The state of the gaol was frightful and, in order to relieve it, an application had been made for a hulk to put some of the prisoners in, otherwise the spread of contagion would be awful. After some discussion the presentment was passed.

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Tulla – 1846

Parable of the Hidden Treasure by Rembrandt (c. 1630). Wikimedia Commons
Parable of the Hidden Treasure by Rembrandt (c. 1630).
Wikimedia Commons

Morning Chronicle 10th January, 1846
Workmen employed by Mrs Dr. Silver at Mount Agentino, near Tulla were throwing down an old house (said to be the oldest in Clare) when they discovered a small leather bag in the wall. It contained thirty nine guineas, of the reign of George II. They also found a curious shaped bottle full of gold and silver coins of various dates, said to be of the value of £250; nine curiously chased silver spoons; an antique fish trowel and a valuable enamelled gold ring. The spoons and ring had the arms and initials of O’Grady on them.

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Foy’s Hill? – 1847

Foy's Hill, Kinvara Photo: Norma Scheibe
Foy’s Hill, Kinvara
Photo: Norma Scheibe
Epidemic Diseases of the Great Famine

Published in 18th–19th – Century
History, Features, Issue 1 (Spring 1996), The Famine, Volume 4 (abridged)

In December 1846, the board of health in Drumkeeran, County Leitrim, resolved to hire a house for use as a fever hospital, there being no such institution within a radius of eighteen miles. The proposal caused ‘inconceivable alarm’ in the town. Sixty-two of the residents, including merchants, shopkeepers, tradesmen, labourers, publicans, and householders, as well as Pat Gallaher, the schoolmaster, addressed a memorial to the Lord Lieutenant, objecting to the establishment of a fever hospital in the centre of the town. They stated that they were not so much opposed to the institution, as to its location.
A rather similar appeal was made by the residents of Kinvarra, County Galway, in July 1847. They claimed that the imminent opening of a fever hospital in the town placed their lives and those of their families in ‘the greatest peril’. They argued that the chosen site was too close to the town, that it either adjoined or was within eight feet of a range of houses occupied by some 300 individuals and was no more than sixty yards from the town centre.